Another patient British pup

Another installment in my patient British dogs series

Dachshund at pub

This little dachshund was patiently sunning himself in a pub terrace in Highgate Village, while waiting for his humans to finish their drinks. I love his rope leash, but it looked way too heavy for his tiny body; I’d have used it on our dogs but not on a creature of his size.

The Wrestlers in Highgate Village

He has a very handsome countenance. I just wish his legs were about two¬†inches longer. I admit that the modern build of the miniature dachshund makes me a bit sad. I have seen a few longer-legged dachshunds here in London, however, and I even saw an impressively fast one retrieving a ball in Regent’s Park. Properly proportioned doxies do exist!

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The patient British pup

Neighborhood on a Wednesday

Another entry in my ongoing series on the impressive patience of English dogs. This happy little guy was waiting outside a Pret in our neighborhood in London. I wanted to scoop him up, but I know that it is simply not done.

Neighborhood on a Wednesday

Teach me, O wise one, your patient ways, that I may import them to my wild shepherds in America…

I don’t tie up our dogs outside when running errands, simply for fear of all of the potentialities (namely, one of them feeling cornered by another dog and lashing out or Pyrrha feeling trapped by a child and attempting to bite), and so I always admire the dogs that seem to have so much composure.

Do you ever tether your dog while you are in a store? If so, how does he or she behave? (And if patiently, how did you train that?)

Dog and a blue door

Along with behaving beautifully in public, British dogs also seem to be extremely patient. It is very common to see them tethered outside restaurants and shops, and the dogs wait with the most heartbreakingly stoic resolve. They don’t try to greet other people or other dogs. They don’t whine or bark or pull. They just sit. And wait.

Like this little guy, waiting in Ambleside (in the Lake District):

AmblesideEven the dogs here observe that “stiff upper lip.”

Ambleside