Pup links!

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Dog-related links from around the Web this week…

Holiday Hazards for Pets. An instructive list of things to watch out for over the holiday season. (The Bark)

DIY Dog Biscuits: Puppy’s First Christmas. A simple recipe for bake-it-yourself dog biscuits. (Pretty Fluffy)

Oh, hello! Why, yes, that’s my crotch: Part 1. A canine behaviorist shares some research on why dogs always go for the crotch when meeting new people. Some interesting findings here! (Dog Spies)

The Problem with Packs. Why the “pack mentality” for dogs is increasingly out of vogue. If we’re not pack leaders, then, what do we call ourselves? Pet parents? I like this blogger’s suggestion of being a “camp counselor” for her dogs. (Fearful Dogs’ Blog)

Should Dogs Eat the Same Food Every Day? Answer: Probably not! (Dog Behavior Blog)

Most Popular Dog Names in the English-Speaking World. Anyone have a dog with one of these names? Anybody got a Molly, Max, Bella, or Jake? (Psychology Today)

Global Community of Running Dogs (Photo Spread, 1933). M.C. provides a funny and insightful exegesis on these pages from a Shanghai magazine from 1933. Even dogs, apparently, can betray our deepest national biases. (House of Two Bows)

Barkour. That is one agile pup. (Animals Being Di*ks)

Dear Three-Legged Dogs. A simple and sweet thank-you note. (THXTHXTHX)

Horse and Dog Play Together Beautifully. This is so sweet and heartwarming. Inter-species friends are probably my all-time favorite phenomenon, and these two look like they may be Best Friends Forever. (Pawesome)

Pup links!

A young Brooke Shields cuddles with a dachshund. Source: LIFE Magazine.

Can the Bulldog Be Saved? As with many of you, I was very pleased to see this comprehensive article published last week in the New York Times Magazine. I’ve already shared some of my thoughts on why I feel that breeding bulldogs is unethical and inhumane, but this article really takes it to the next level. An illuminating quote from the article:

“The bulldog is unique for the sheer breadth of its health problems,” says Brian Adams, formerly the head of media-relations at M.S.P.C.A.-Angell Animal Medical Center in Boston. “A typical breed will have one or two common problem areas. The bulldog has so many. When I first started working at Angell, the joke was that these dogs are a $5,000 check just waiting to happen. But the joke gets old fast, because many of these dogs are suffering.”

Or this:

[Dr. Sandra] Sawchuk is the rare veterinarian who owns a bulldog. “I should know better, but I’m a sucker for this breed,” she told me. “I’m also a vet, so I feel I can handle any problems that come up. But if anyone else tells me they want a bulldog, my immediate response is, ‘No, you don’t.’ ”

This piece also highlights the considerable villainy of the AKC, which refuses to ask the Bulldog Club of America to revise its standard for the breed. Why? Because bulldogs are popular these days, having skyrocketed to the no. 6 most popular purebreed in the United States. It’s all about the money and the registrations for them. Who cares if we’re killing these dogs by insane breeding practices? I’m just hopeful that many people–aside from those of us who already believe that breeding the modern bulldog is inhumane–will read this article and reconsider bringing a bulldog puppy home. (NYT Magazine)

The Art and Science of Naming a Dog. I love meeting well-named dogs and I think names are very important. Stanley Coren reflects on the psychological aspects of naming our canines. (Psychology Today)

Pretty Fluffy Gift Guide for Dogs. It’s that time of the year! Let the shopping madness begin. (Pretty Fluffy)

The Scoop: Gemma Correll and Mr. Norman Pickles. A fun interview with one of my favorite illustrators Gemma Correll, and her pug, Mr. Norman Pickles. (Dog Milk)

Five Training Tips for First-Time Dog Trainers. A basic but sincerely helpful list of reminders for people like me! (The Three Dog Blog)

A Different Kind of Dog Rescue. This place looks magical. This is definitely what I would do with my life if my husband weren’t around to keep me from being a borderline animal hoarder. (Although this woman sounds amazing and is not a hoarder.) (Love and a Leash)

Three Levels of Pet Safety. Engraved tag, BlanketID, and microchip! I didn’t know how BlanketID worked, but it sounds like a pretty cool device. Does anyone have one for their dogs? (Go Pet Friendly)

Corgi Owners. A funny note with regard to the blessedness of being a corgi person. (Dogblog)

Pup links!

An Aussie and his castle. Source: blacksheepcardigans.com

A lot of great dog-related links from around the Web this week!

Dogs of Darjeeling. This is the best pup link I’ve seen yet: My sister’s amazing and beautiful photographs of the dogs she saw while she was living in and around Darjeeling, India. So striking! The photos make me remember that, regardless of where in the world you are, dogs are still dogs. It’s perhaps a silly thing to think, but I an enamored with this collection of her photography. Check it out. (Como Say What?)

Why You’re NOT Doing a Good Deed When You “Rescue” that Pet Store Puppy. This is an article I wish so many people would read. It’s such an ethically murky situation, I know, but this is a perspective that needs to be amplified. (Dogster)

Why Dog Women Get More Respect than Cat Ladies. An interesting article on Slate this week about why it’s easier to be taken seriously if you’re a crazy dog lady instead of a crazy cat lady. Not fair, of course, but a curious cultural phenomenon, perhaps. (Slate)

New York Times Goes Dog-Crazy. A brief look at the dog-centric memoirs that are cropping up in the pages of the Times. (Daily Intel)

How Much Money Should I Spend on My Dog’s Vet Care? And how much is too much? A well-expressed opinion from Lindsey Stordahl about how we navigate the difficult decisions between veterinary care, finances, and our dogs. (That Mutt)

26 Reasons Why Owning a Puppy Is the Same as Raising a Toddler. A funny list, but it certainly emphasizes what a serious commitment we undertake when we bring a puppy into our lives. (A Peek Inside the Fishbowl)

Diary by Kingsley: I Made a Video. One of the blogosphere’s most famous bulldogs, Kingsley, has a video playing with his new sister, human baby Eleanor. (Rockstar Diaries)

Hello, I Feel Like I Know You. Sweet and colorful portraits of dogs and their humans by artist Paule Trudel Bellmare. (Under the Blanket)

Don’t Like Your New Dog’s Name? Karen London gives some practical tips on changing your adopted dog’s name. I feel pretty sure that I will want to rename our future dog, and so this is a helpful thing to think about. What about you? Did you change your dog’s name? (The Bark)

Inspiring Photos of Pets with Disabilities. A charming collection of portraits of dogs with disabilities. There is joy and life in their eyes. (Flavorwire)

Breed love: Corgi

Get it, corgi. This is my favorite corgi photo ever. Click for source.

Corgis are the pint-sized members of the herding group, my favorite breed category in the AKC. Corgis come in two flavors: the Pembroke Welsh corgi and the Cardigan Welsh corgi. Pembrokes typically come in the fawn and sable variety (like the sassy Pembroke in the photo above) and have docked tails. Cardigans are slightly bigger and have tails; Cardigans may also come in a wider range of colors, like the tricolor puppy in the photo below.

Queen Elizabeth II is largely responsible for the popularization of this spirited little breed in the 20th and 21st centuries. She grew up with corgis and continues to keep them today. I also think she has a great collection of names for them; Myth and Fable were two of her corgis and I think those are great dog names.

Everyone wants a piece...

Like most herding breeds, corgis are known for being snappy and vocal. They are quick-witted and easily trained. And despite their short legs, many corgis also excel at agility.

Many people who are fond of the bigger herding breeds often pick up a corgi along the way. Corgis pack a lot of dog into a little body. I’m certainly open to the idea of a corgi at this point, but they admittedly rank below some of the other breeds in my mind right now.

Corgi links:

Favorite male dog names

German Shepherd. Source: Pet Planet UK

I’ve already listed my favorite female names for our future dog. Here are some of my favorites for the boys!

  • Soren
  • Finn
  • Oberon
  • Pilot
  • Luka
  • Gage
  • Silas
  • Zane
  • Dash
  • Odin
  • Sailor
  • Moses
  • North
  • Desmond
  • Jude
  • Ronan
  • George
  • Milan
  • Ari
  • Theo
  • Keeper
  • Seamus
  • Archer
  • Beckett
  • Knox
  • Nye
  • Phoenix
  • Ezra
  • Flynn
  • Teague

Think I have enough potential names? I’m doubtful. (I also feel like we’ll probably end up naming our future dog something that doesn’t exist on either list. Will have to just meet him/her first!)

Favorite female dog names

Australian Shepherd. Source: Davis Dog

Even though our future dog won’t be here for at least a year, I’ve already started making lists of my favorite names for a dog. I know. I’m a total nerd.

Here are my favorite names for a female dog:

  • Fable
  • Haven
  • Vita Sackville-West
  • Lena
  • Circe
  • Veda
  • Yume
  • Coraline
  • Gemma
  • Mirabelle
  • Flora
  • Violet
  • Ada
  • Niamh
  • Libby
  • Brynn
  • Esme
  • Lila
  • Margot Tenenbaum
  • Roxanne
  • Sachiko
  • Rita Hayworth
  • Willow
  • Sula
  • Sage
  • Cosette

How about you? What did you name your dog and why?

I’ll publish my list of favorite male dog names shortly!