Over and Over Tune

 

saluki.

Over and Over Tune

Ionna Carlsen

You could grow into it,
that sense of living like a dog,
loyal to being on your own in the fur of your skin,
able to exist only for the sake of existing.

Nothing inside your head lasting long enough for you to hold onto,
you watch your own thoughts leap across your own synapses and disappear—
small boats in a wind,
fliers in all that blue,
the swish of an arm backed with feathers,
a dress talking in a corner,
and then poof,
your mind clean as a dog’s,
your body big as the world,
important with accident—
blood or a limp, fur and paws.

You swell into survival,
you take up the whole day,
you’re all there is,
everything else is
not you, is every passing glint, is
shadows brought to you by wind,
passing into a bird’s cheep, replaced by a
rabbit skittering across a yard,
a void you yourself fall into.

You could make this beautiful,
but you don’t need to,
living is this fleshy side of the bone,
going on is this medicinal smell of the sun—
no dog ever tires of seeing his life

keep showing up at the back door
even as a rotting bone with a bad smell;
feet tottering, he dreams of it,
wakes and licks no matter what.

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Happy Friday, everyone! Love the notion in this poem, of what it might be like to be a dog, but on a deeper, metaphysical level.

One reason for dressing well

Theda Bara with a dog, c. 1915. Click for source.
Theda Bara with a dog, c. 1915. Click for source.

“There is one other reason for dressing well, namely that dogs respect it, and will not attack you in good clothes.”

— Ralph Waldo Emerson

. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .

Happy Friday!

I think this quote is hilarious, even if it’s definitely untrue in my experience! Eden always seems to know when I’m in my (finally pressed and lint/fur-rolled) work clothes and sees that as a great time to pounce.

For a season last year, I went through a fleeting obsession with fashion and dressing well. But then we got a second German shepherd, and all style aspirations went out the window. I recently canceled my Vogue subscription, finally realizing, “This publication is NOT for me. I come home from work and put on my ‘dog jeans’ and a flannel shirt. I’ve never worn a single designer dress and probably never will.” Maybe people who have tiny dogs can be fashionable, but I don’t think it’s in the cards for me.

1926: Mrs H Bebbington and her Great Dane Hereward of Cubourough at the Croydon Dog Show.
Mrs. H. Bebbington and her Great Dane at the Croydon Dog Show, c. 1926. Click for source.

What do you think? Are fashion sense and dog ownership at odds with one another?

Gallery of hounds

Can you tell that I’m very partial to sighthounds? I adore them and yet they are extremely mysterious to me. I feel like I don’t understand them at all, but I want to. Some years down the road, I’m quite serious about adopting a former racing greyhound. Reading Tales and Tails also makes me believe that it would be possible for two such divergent dogs as a German shepherd and a greyhound could happily and peacefully coexist.

(Click on a photo to be taken to its source.)

Borzoi

Borzoi

Gypsy Rose Lee and her Afghan hound

Afghan hound

Greyhounds

Greyhound

Saluki

Saluki in the snow

Irish wolfhound

Irish wolfhound

Breed Love: Saluki

saluki Atreyu owned by Laurie
Graceful and beautiful saluki. Source: Flickr, user hawksview

My lifelong dog obsession began when I was 8 or 9. Since that time, I have been enamored with the saluki. I mean, just look at these dogs! They are breathtakingly beautiful. I could look at pictures of salukis all day long. (I think when I was a child, I fancied that salukis were my “spirit animal.” I found this written in a diary by my 10-year-old self. I don’t know what it means, but there you have it.)

The saluki, the royal dog of Egypt, is one of the world’s oldest dog breeds. These fleet-footed sighthounds were used by the ancient Egyptians for hunting. Today, I think you’d be hard-pressed to find a saluki hunting. Rather, I’d imagine you’d find these regal dogs lounging on beds of purple velvet stuffed with goose down. Simply put, salukis are still very rare in the United States and you’d be paying thousands of dollars for a purebred puppy.

Saluki Bitch
Pretty lady in the show ring. Source: Flickr, user neil_e_lloyd

For that reason alone, I don’t think I’d ever actually get a saluki. Add their rarity and cost to the fact that they’re highly independent and cat-like, and I think the chances are slim that we’ll be buying a saluki anytime soon. But that still doesn’t stop my lifelong admiration for this breed. It’s one of my life goals, I think, to actually meet a saluki. I need to find some dog shows…

Saluki links: