Eden’s annual checkup

Eden at the vet | Doggerel

Eden had her annual check-up at the vet on Friday, and I’m happy to report that she got the all-clear! After those exhausting and expensive months figuring out her health issues (which turned out to be a heavy-duty case of giardia, which somehow kept disguising itself in tests), it’s relieving to know that she’s finally healthy.

She’s up to 55 pounds now, which is also great. During the giardia struggle, she was down to a very skinny 43 pounds, which was just terrible. The vet said she could still probably gain a few more pounds and still be in a healthy range. She eats so much already and we’re never hesitant with the treats, because I think (a) she is burning calories all day long, as she is rarely ever still, and (b) she may just be one of those dogs with the high metabolism who will always be thin. Obviously, we will watch her weight conscientiously, but I’m happy with a trim, healthy pup.

Eden at the vet | Doggerel

Thanks to fish oil, her coat is also looking very shiny and healthy, and the vet commented on how much better her skin looked.

Behaviorally, I was dismayed by her nervousness at the vet. While we were waiting, we got to practice a lot of calm/settle behaviors, and she was happily focused on me and relaxed, but when the vet/technician came in, she was quite uncertain about their intentions (although she went up to greet them individually). She hadn’t displayed this kind of anxiety there before, and so it surprised me. She was very averse to being handled by the vet and the technician, but she was still taking treats from me throughout, and she was able to cool down once they stopped trying to check her out. I’m not sure what this means, except that we need to work more on her comfort level in being handled by strangers. The vet also mused on whether this burst of anxiety could be related to the recent conclusion of her second heat.

Regardless, we’re glad that our little psycho is finally in a good, healthy place!

Eden at the vet | Doggerel

How are your pups doing physically? Any good news to report?

How do you break up with your vet?

Have you ever broken up with your vet? If so, why? Care to share your experiences?

“The Veterinarian,” Norman Rockwell.

I’ve not totally made up my mind to do this, but I’ve been thinking lately about finding another vet. It’s not for any serious disputes, though. In general, they’ve been great, and they’re always very responsive when we have issues. We were in their office every week in April, for various issues, and they were supportive and kind.

So, why am I thinking about breaking up?


  • Distance. It takes us about an hour by car, round trip, to get to them. This exhausts me. And it’s an added expense.
  • Sometimes I question their knowledge base. Naturally, I do not have a vet degree, and so I trust them… but with all of our health issues lately, sometimes I felt like I was the one pointing things out or suggesting tests or treatments. That made me feel uneasy.

But maybe I’m crazy, because:


  • Seem to be cheaper than most local vets, who cater to the rich pups (our town is wealthier than we are).
  • Really sweet, all-female staff.
  • Have worked with lots of shepherds from the girls’ rescue, so they are very familiar with shy German shepherds.

I don’t want to break up with them, because they are so nice, but Guion wants to. He’d prefer to go somewhere nearby, and he also feels like their advice sometimes doesn’t make sense. What do you think? Am I crazy for even considering it?

Choosing a vet

Boy in Veterinarian's Office

Boy in Veterinarian's Office, Norman Rockwell.

Next on my list of things to do before bringing a dog home: Finding a local veterinarian. This one is also somewhat intimidating to me. I’m planning on asking friends with dogs who they’d recommend in the area, but beyond that, I’m curious what you think about how to go about this process.

What kinds of questions should I ask a prospective vet? What are some things to watch out for? How will I know to evaluate them if I don’t have a dog yet? Does anyone go to a vet who practices holistic or homeopathic medicine?

Still so many questions! And I’m, as always, grateful for your advice!

Pup links!

A young Beatrix Potter and her spaniel. LIFE Magazine.

A collection of dog-related links from around the Web this week:

Set Your New Dog Up for Success: Prevent Accidents and Fights. A great post by Lindsay about two important elements of bringing a new dog home: Setting and establishing house-training rules and preventing and mitigating any potential dog conflict. (That Mutt)

Are Too Many Vaccinations Bad for Adult Dogs? A thoughtful and informative discussion about the controversy over vaccinating our dogs. This is something I’ve been thinking about lately, too, and it was nice to read such a balanced and fair article on the topic. (That Mutt)

Pet Fostering Is Tax Deductible! This is great news for those who foster animals. It’s something I’m seriously considering after we have a few years of dog parenting under our belts, and this new tax break is just an extra incentive! (Pawesome)

7 Ways to Make Your Pet’s Visit to the Veterinarian Easier. Simple and helpful tips to reduce the stress of a vet visit. (Paw Nation)

Ryan Gosling and His Dog Have an Announcement to Make. An important PSA from the most popular actor (at least on the Internet meme scene). (Pawesome)

Miss Kate. It is a beautiful thing to watch a border collie work. (BCxFour)

Georgia Fiennes: Dog Paintings. Lovely and whimsical (but not tacky) dog paintings from artist Georgia Fiennes. (Miles to Style)

Review: The Well Dog Book

The Well Dog Book, by Terri McGinnis

Continuing in my vein of reading dog health books, I found a copy of the second edition (1992) of The Well Dog Book, by Terri McGinnis, DVM. It’s a bit old, but I reasoned that the field of caring for dogs hasn’t changed all that much.

I think I was wrong.

While the book is primarily about canine medicine and preventative care, I was utterly appalled at Dr. McGinnis’ recommended training techniques. Since the book was initially written in the 1980s, it is not surprising that she follows the now outdated dominance philosophy with regard to dog psychology. What was surprising to me is her strong statements that physical punishment is always necessary to establish “dominance” and “pack leadership.” The book even includes these horrible diagrams about how to push a dog’s head to the ground when it disobeys and how to pick you dog up by the scruff of its neck and give it a good shake. I was, clearly, mortified.

After reading that chapter, I’ll admit that it was difficult to take the rest of the book seriously. I don’t doubt that Dr. McGinnis is probably a reliable veterinarian. I imagine I’ll be returning to this book if I have any basic medical questions about our future dog, but I certainly won’t be looking to it for any behavioral advice.

Review: Dr. Pitcairn’s Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats

Dr. Pitcairn's Guide to Complete Natural Health for Dogs and Cats

I got a used copy of the older edition of this reference book, Dr. Pitcairn’s Complete Guide to Natural Health for Dogs and Cats. The more I learn about dog food and even what humans eat in general, the more I want to just eat happy, pesticide-free plants.

Despite the lack of any medical degree, my mother has always espoused a general mistrust of traditional Western medicine, and I suppose I have a little bit of that in me. That said, I found Dr. Pitcairn’s book quite interesting.

Some of his recommendations sounded pretty kooky–the discussion of the unquantifiable and unknowable “life force” that permeates all things, which we must channel for our own benefit–but overall, I think this book provided a helpful overview of the alternative medicine techniques and therapies for dogs and cats.

The emphasis of the book is grounded strongly in preventative medicine. Pitcairn advises that the first thing we must do is create a healthy, non-toxic environment for our animals to live in (ourselves included!). This means keeping all chemicals at bay, when at all possible; shying away from plastics; any synthetic products that do not come directly from the earth, and so forth.

The second big emphasis on the book is understandably on diet. The more we learn about health, the more we understand the indelible link between what we eat and how our bodies perform. This is just as true for dogs as it is for us. Feeding your dog a bag of generic kibble may be cheap and convenient, but you’d just be filling your pet with animal byproducts, unnatural chemicals, and known toxins. This leads to the breakdown of a dog’s entire system, Pitcairn asserts. He pushes for a raw food diet, which is a serious commitment, but also gives advice for those who can’t or won’t make that kind of time.

I don’t know if there are any veterinarians in my area who practice alternative or homeopathic medicine, but I’m definitely interested in looking further into this topic.

Do you practice any alternative medicine or home remedies with your dog? Does your vet? What have you learned?