Primer on German shepherd markings

(Photos updated 12 March 2013.)

In all of my reading about German shepherds, I keep getting confused about the different coat colors and markings. I forget what “sable” means, what “black and red” looks like, and all the other labels in between (“saddle” versus a “blanket” pattern? I don’t know). In an effort not to sound like an idiot when I do talk with the rescues, here’s my little bit of research on GSD markings.

This is the official AKC standard for the GSD coat and markings. Some, especially those with white GSDs, obviously take issue with this standard, but that’s another debate for another time.

The German Shepherd Dog varies in color, and most colors are permissible. Strong rich colors are preferred. Pale, washed-out colors and blues or livers are serious faults. A white dog must be disqualified.

Here’s a sampling of the different coats I’ve found, doing my best to rely on examples from the rescues I’ve applied to. If you live in the area, maybe one of these dogs will speak to you! Most of the ones below are up for adoption!

Black and Red

Zeva. (c) SGSR.
Zeva. (c) SGSR.
Layla. (c) SGSR.
Layla. (c) SGSR.

Black and red tends to be a more popular coat color in Europe, I’ve heard. I think it’s very beautiful and rich-looking. These dogs are Zeva and Layla, who were both adopted through Southeast German Shepherd Rescue.

Black and Tan

Regal
Pyrrha!

Our dog Pyrrha is a classic black-and-tan. She has a very traditional (for U.S. GSDs) coat pattern. The tan, as you can see, is quite light. She has almost a full saddle (the black pattern). There are plenty more photos of Pyrrha and her coat pattern on this blog, obviously!

Black and Cream

jadyn-blackcream
Jadyn. (c) SGSR.

Black and cream tends to be more diluted than the tans and reds, clearly. (Pyrrha is almost a black and cream, and I think she could become one in her old age.) This is Jadyn, who was adopted through SGSR, too.

Black and Silver

(c) German Shepherd Breeders.

OK, I am not an expert, obviously, so I have trouble distinguishing between black and cream and black and silver. This long-coat is apparently a black and silver. What do you think? Can you tell the difference?

Bicolor

Post-bath Brando
Brando, our first foster.

OK, here’s where I need someone more experienced to explain. Is there any difference between “bicolor” and the other “black and [other color]” patterns? I feel like the bicolors usually have little eyebrow markings, but I don’t really know. This dude is Brando, our first foster from Southeast German Shepherd Rescue. You can see the brown points on his legs.

Sable

Xander, recently adopted through SGSR!
enya-sable
Enya. (c) SGSR.

These dogs are Xander and Enya, who were adopted through SGSR. I’ve tried to remember this pattern as “the wolf pattern,” because sable GSDs make me think of wolves more than anything else. I’ve come to really love this coat, too. For whatever reason, sables look extra-intense to me, even more than your standard black and red/tan.

Solid Black

Source: Wikimedia Commons.

You get the idea: Solid black coat, no other markings. He looks so sleek. Many people are surprised to learn that GSDs can come in all black, with no markings at all.

Solid White

Dakota. (c) SGSR.
Dakota. (c) SGSR.

Solid white GSDs are considered a fault in the AKC and cannot be shown, but I think they are quite beautiful. This is Dakota, who was adopted through SGSR, too.

Gray/Blue (rare!)

L to R: Blue GSD, blue Belgian malinois, and blue Dutch shepherd. Photo from Cher Car Kennels.

OK, couldn’t find any gray/blue dogs up for rescue, so this is a photo from Cher Car Kennels. Gray and blue dogs are considered serious faults according to the AKC standard. I know these are three different breeds, but I think the only dog I could correctly identify as “blue” would be the Dutch shepherd on the far right. I think I would have missed it in the GSD and malinois. How about you? Have you ever seen a blue GSD?

Red/Liver Sable (rare!)

Quinn. (c) SGSR
Quinn. (c) SGSR

Quinn is a beautiful liver-sable girl who was adopted through SGSR recently. Isn’t she striking? This is a very rare coat pattern and is generally considered a fault in AKC standards.

And this is Marli, a liver GSD, also adopted through SGSR.

marli-liver
Marli. (c) SGSR.

And, of course, don’t forget the long coats!

Long-coat GSDs

The following dogs were all adopted through Southeast German Shepherd Rescue.

Galen. (c) SGSR.
Galen. (c) SGSR.
Breeze (c) SGSR.
Breeze (c) SGSR.
Atlas (c) SGSR.
Atlas (c) SGSR.
Scout (c) SGSR.
Scout (c) SGSR.

I love the diversity of coats and colors in the shepherd. I think many people are unaware that they can come in so many different colors!

More comprehensive information on GSD markings online:

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Pup links!

The collies are listening. Click for source.

The big news of the day is that we have now officially submitted our applications to the Virginia German Shepherd Rescue and Southeast German Shepherd Rescue! Even though we won’t move until May, I wanted to go ahead and send our applications so the vetting and approval process could get underway. It goes without saying that I am so excited.

Here are some dog-related links from around the web this past week:

Social Dominance Is Not a Myth: Wolves, Dogs, and Other Animals. Marc Bekoff addresses the other side of the dominance coin and points out that we shouldn’t throw it out entirely. Wolves do exhibit dominance and the research is perhaps more nuanced than we formerly thought. Interesting. (The Bark Blog)

Sidetracked by Grammar. As a copy editor and a dog lover, I definitely appreciated this vet’s list of grammatical pet peeves. The one that really gets under my skin? People who write about “German shepards.” Nope. Not a thing. Learn how to spell. (Pawcurious)

Pocket Petunia’s Big Adventure. A sweet post about therapy dogs visiting a local school and teaching kids about kindness and mercy toward others. (Love and a Six-Foot Leash)

Color-Coded Dogs. Fun photos of dogs playing in groups arranged by fur color. (Ours for a Year)

Canine Pregnancy Detector. Dogs really can smell everything… (Fido & Wino)

Day Twenty-One. A little girl and her dog: Big frown and then a big laugh! (Emily Corey Photography)